Car Window Tinting Laws by State — Legal Tint Limit and Percentages

Car window tinting is today one of the most popular modifications drivers are applying to their vehicles. It includes a lot of benefits, among which protecting the passengers from the harmful effects of UV rays and increasing privacy. Moreover, tinting your windows can add aesthetic value to your car and improve its look. 

However, there are laws and regulations that any driver should be aware of when deciding to modify their car. These policies vary from state to state and they can be quite confusing if you have never looked into it before.

Let’s have a look at the pros and cons of tinting your car windows, the limitations that you might be facing, and how the laws change in different states. So, you can have a stress-free window-tinting experience!

Car window tinting laws in the US.

Things to Know When Tinting Your Window

U.S. states boast different laws and regulations that can make the life of drivers more difficult than expected. Moreover, the policies regarding the tinting quality, processes, and percentages can change depending on what window you are willing to tint.

Being aware of some factors such as the terminology used, what the percentages refer to and how your address can change the limitations you will have to face can help you navigate among the laws. 

Where You Live Can Make A Difference

States’ laws are primarily concerned with ensuring that your driving experience is completely safe. By darkening your front window, you might be compromising your ability to see the road, possible obstacles, and pedestrians.

While complying with these regulations can take quite a bit of research, you should inform yourself about what the limits are to avoid modifying your car into an unsafe vehicle.

Moreover, while privacy is arguably the main reason for drivers to modify their car windows look, some States prefer to guarantee a higher level of safety for the public. Therefore, they require the driver and front passenger to be visible by cameras and officers.

This can seldom represent an annoyance for any car owner that decides to tint their car’s windows but failing to become knowledgeable about these restrictions can create misunderstanding with law enforcement officers.

Ultimately, States tend to embrace laws that reflect the local environment. In sunnier, hotter places you will be able to tint your windows darker. In areas famous for poor visibility or weather conditions, it is required for any driver to have optimal visibility of the road and surroundings.

Be Aware of The Terminology

While you will most likely get to know these terms when going through your car windows tinting process, being aware of the current terminology can help you decide in advance your budget and vehicle’s look.

If you are personally looking into the laws of your state, learning these terms can help you decipher what the different requirements mean. Let’s have a look at the most common terms.

Vlt%

“Visible Light Transmission” percentage: this is the general unit of measure of window tints. It represents the percentage of visible light that can penetrate through the film or window. The lower this percentage is, the less light can get through the tint, the darker your windows will look.

Front-Side Window Tint Level

The VLT percentage you are allowed on your front-side window. This is the window you and your front passengers are looking at while driving or in the car. Often, this percentage is higher than for the rear window, as it allows the driver to see the road and, vice-versa, be seen from the outside.

Rear-Side Window Tint Level

This is the VLT percentage you are allowed on your rear-side window. It is usually lower than the front window, meaning that the tint can be darker. The required value can differ for multi-purpose vehicles (MPVs) and vans.

Rear Window Tint Level

This VLT percentage specifies the amount of tint you can apply on your rear window. It is often the same as the rear side window for a better aesthetic effect, but in some states, the regulations can be stricter.

Windshield

It cannot be tinted in the U.S., but you will be able to apply stickers in some states in the area already marked by the manufacturer’s sun shield.

Colour

Tint’s colors or finishes (reflective or mirrored) can vary greatly from State to State. Some areas don’t have color limitations as far as you are only tinting following the restrictions regarding VLT%.

As-1 Line

This line is drawn from the letters AS-1 which you can notice on the windshield of your vehicle. It runs parallel to the top of the mirror and it’s roughly 5 inches wide. State laws regarding the tinting of this line vary.

Percentages Count

If you are in the process of examining the laws that apply to your area, you will have noticed that the restrictions are expressed in percentages. As we have already seen, that percentage indicates the amount of visible light that is able to penetrate the window after applying the tint.

Generally, the lower the percentage is, the darker your windows will be. These percentages can vary depending on what window you are taking into consideration. Often, the rear and rear-side windows are allowed lower percentages than the front windows. This is for safety and privacy reasons.

A different value expressed in percentages is the reflectivity. This indicates the amount of light that is reflected by the newly tinted windows. Often this percentage cannot exceed 35%.

Know Your Car Model

After checking all the regulations and laws that apply in your local area, you will have to have a look at the type of vehicle you are willing to tint. Cars and passenger vehicles have different restrictions from multi-purpose vehicles and vans. Moreover, there are laws applying exclusively to SUVs.

If you are planning to move from a state to another, it is recommended to wait until you have moved there before starting to modify your car. If you are buying an SUV with tinted windows, make sure it is legal to be driven in the other state.

Since this can represent a major investment, you might want to consider buying your car in the state you are moving into. This will eliminate all doubts and stress related to your car’s specifications. 

Exceptions

Many states apply exceptions to the restrictions and laws regarding car windows tinting for medical conditions. These are conditions that can increase the damage of UV rays on the skin and eyes of the patient.

If you believe you are affected by one of these health conditions, you will be able to request a permit that allows you to tint your car windows darker. Let’s have a look at the most common conditions that can require darker tints.

  • Melanoma
  • Psoriasis 
  • Solar Urticaria
  • Dermatomyositis

Other less common health conditions such as Pellagra and Bloom syndrome can also require different adaptations of the laws. However, anybody affected by these anomalies should be carrying appropriate documentation with them at all times. These permits should specify:

  • Name and specifications of the medically diagnosed condition, certified by a professional.
  • Allowed duration of daily UV exposure and the maximum UV amount.
  • Specifications of the vehicle to which the exemptions are applied.

If you are modifying your car due to medical conditions, it is recommended to get your car inspected and certified by professionals. The strength and quality of the tint can also be tested through photometers. To reach out for help, get in touch with the department of motor vehicles in your state.

Pros and Cons of Tinting Your Window

Tinting your car’s windows can have a number of benefits, aside from improving the look of your car. However, the process of modifying your car can be fairly confusing and will require research and knowledge. It is important to fully understand the pros and cons of tinting your car’s windows before undertaking the makeover.

Benefits

Increased Privacy of The Vehicle

Often used by corporate drivers, tinted car windows improve the quality of the privacy your vehicle can offer you. For business cars, it is important to protect the whereabouts of their clients. Similarly, to limousines, when dealing with the public is essential to maintain a low profile. 

For your private car, you can decide how important privacy is for you while driving or when your car is parked in the parking lot. However, it has been seen that darkened windows can act as a deterrent for thieves.

In fact, since they would not be able to see in your car, there are fewer chances that they will try a break-in. In case you are carrying valuables in your car, this can be the perfect solution for you.

Lowers the Internal Temperature of Your Car

Especially if you live in a hot climate’s state such as Mexico or California, you will be familiar with the temperatures your car can reach when it has been left under the sun for hours. However, it is not always possible to find a parking space in the shadow. If you are using your car for daily activities or to commute to work, you might want to consider tinting your car windows to lower the car. 

This has been proven to be an extremely effective way to maintain your car cooler during long exposures to sun and heat.

The Tint Can Block UV Rays

Nowadays we are all aware of the damaging effects of UV rays not only for our skin and eyes but also for the interiors of our vehicles. If you tend to use your car for long journeys during hours of daytime, you will want to consider tinting your car windows. It has in fact been seen that they can block up to 99% of UV rays, protecting both you and the interiors of your car.

The Film or Tint Can Strengthen Your Windows

It is fairly common in America having to repair or replace some of your car windows because they have been damaged by a rock or pebble. If you are often driving through countryside roads especially, tinting your car windows can help you protect your windows from shattering. By adding an extra layer of protection, the tint or film you have applied to your windows can avoid you having to repair chips and cracks often.

Protects Your Car’s Interiors

Long exposure to direct sunlight and UV rays can have damaging effects on the interiors and upholstery of your vehicle. To avoid seeing your leather seats cracking or your carpet’s color fading away, tinting your car window is an easy go-to solution. Especially if you have been investing in your car, you will want to keep it in perfect conditions or as long as you can!

Drawbacks

Reduced Visibility

By tinting your windows and applying stickers to your AS-1 line, you will be reducing the driver’s visibility of roads, possible obstacles, pedestrians, and surroundings. While if you are complying with the local laws you will be protected to some degree, inexperienced drivers should not attempt to drive a car with reduced visibility. 

Moreover, the tints will prevent some of the light from entering your vehicle. While this is not considered a problem during the hours of daylight, it can create issues when night driving. If you use your car mainly during evening hours or night journey, you might want to consider delaying tinting your windows.

Legal Issues

With the intricate labyrinth of laws, it can be difficult to comply with all the regulations. If you have been darkening your car windows yourself, there is always the possibility of incurring legal issues. These can potentially be reduced by cooperating with a professional throughout the process.

Moreover, some of the restrictions use vague terms such as “non-reflective” or “non-excessive”, which can create confusion. Interpretations of these terms can vary, and you might face legal issues in the future. In this case, it is best to maintain the tint or reflectivity of your windows as low as possible.

Costs and Processes

The costs and processes of applying a tint to your car windows can vary massively. It usually depends on the retailer you have decided to work with and on the type of tint, you have picked. Let’s have a look at what the costs are and how to minimize them without compromising the quality of your tint.

Costs

The tints that are available today on the market are of different qualities and materials. It is possible to undertake a DIY tinting process for just over $20, but you will need high skills and precision to avoid ruining your car’s look. Moreover, many users have experienced trouble with the film coming off the window within a few months of the application.

For certified retailers, the cost can be much higher. If you are planning on tinting more than one window, some professionals have offers and discounts for tinting all of your windows. For standard, non-reflective film, the price can range between $25 and $99 for a single window. This is a low-cost and long-term solution that can be applied to any car. 

If you drive a delivery van or prefer to use your car during daytime for long journeys, you might want to consider investing in heat-rejector tints. However, this can bring the cost up to $400 for the entire car. For high-performance ceramic, carbon, metallic and colored tints the price can be as high as $800.

Where and How to Get Your Window Tinted

Tinting your windows at home can be a great DIY exercise if you are modifying an old or second-hand car. If you are not an expert, make sure this will not ruin your investment. The process is easy, and all the materials can be found on Amazon.

If you believe you need help while applying the film, YouTube tutorials can help you in this case. If you are not sure whether you should be undertaking this process yourself or request the help of a professional, checking out these videos will give you an idea of the procedures and the skills involved.

The only main benefit of reaching out for a professional retailer is to have a warranty. Outsourcing your car window tinting can be quite expensive, especially if you are planning to use high-quality materials. However, in this case, a warranty that protects your investment against weather and time damages can be essential.

Laws and Regulations by State

We have mentioned that laws can vary greatly depending on the state you are in. here we are going to have a look in detail at the requirements of the different areas and how to approach them. Aside from VLT percentages, some states apply other restrictions that any driver should be aware of.

Alabama

  • Front Side Windows: 32%
  • Back Side Windows: 32%
  • Rear Windows: 32%
  • Windshield: 6 inches
  • Reflectivity percentage: 20% or less
  • Side mirror restrictions: no restrictions
  • Color restrictions: no restrictions
  • Medical exemptions: allowed for tint

Alaska

  • Front Side Windows: 70%
  • Back Side Windows: 40%
  • Rear Windows: 40%
  • Windshield: 5 inches
  • Reflectivity: no metallic and mirrored tints allowed 
  • Side mirror restrictions: no restriction
  • Color restrictions: no red, yellow, and amber allowed
  • Medical exemptions: allowed, but they need to be renewed annually

Arizona

  • Front Side Windows: 33%
  • Back Side Windows: Any
  • Rear Windows: Any
  • Windshield: AS-1-line tinting allowed (complying with manufacturer’s measurements.)
  • Reflectivity: lower than 35% 
  • Side mirror restrictions: dual side mirrors needed
  • Color restrictions: red and amber not allowed
  • Medical exemptions: not specified

Arkansas

  • Front Side Windows: 25%
  • Back Side Windows: 25%
  • Rear Windows: 10%
  • Windshield: 5 inches
  • Reflectivity: no metallic/mirrored tints
  • Side mirror restrictions: not specified
  • Color restrictions: not specified
  • Medical exemptions: need to be carried along with a physician’s certification within the vehicle.

California

  • Front Side Windows: 70%
  • Back Side Windows: Any
  • Rear Windows: Any
  • Windshield: 4 inches
  • Reflectivity: no more reflective than a standard window
  • Side mirror restrictions: dual side mirrors needed
  • Color restrictions: red, amber, and blue not allowed, the side windows must be colorless. 
  • Medical exemptions: not specified

Colorado

  • Front Side Windows: 27%
  • Back Side Windows: 27%
  • Rear Windows: 27%
  • Windshield: 4 inches
  • Reflectivity: no metallic/mirrored
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirror required
  • Color restrictions: red and amber not allowed
  • Medical exemptions: does not allow medical exemptions.

Connecticut

  • Front Side Windows: 35%
  • Back Side Windows: 35%
  • Rear Windows: Any
  • Windshield: as-1 line and above (not reflective)   
  • Reflectivity: no more than 21% reflective
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors required
  • Color restrictions: all colors permitted
  • Medical exemptions: VLT 20% modification allowed

Delaware

  • Front Side Windows: 70%
  • Back Side Windows: Any
  • Rear Windows: Any
  • Windshield: as-1 line and above (nonreflective)
  • Reflectivity: no metallic/ mirrored 
  • Side mirror restrictions: none
  • Color restrictions: none
  • Medical exemptions: not specified

Florida

  • Front Side Windows: 28%
  • Back Side Windows: 15%
  • Rear Windows: 15%
  • Windshield: AS-1 line and above (nonreflective)
  • Reflectivity: no more than 25% reflective
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed
  • Color restrictions: no colored tints allowed
  • Medical exemptions: allowed

Georgia

  • Front Side Windows: 32%
  • Back Side Windows: 32%
  • Rear Windows: 32%
  • Windshield: 6 inches
  • Reflectivity:  lower than 20% 
  • Side mirror restrictions: no restrictions
  • Color restrictions: red and amber not allowed
  • Medical exemptions: special permit required

Hawaii

  • Front Side Windows: 35%
  • Back Side Windows: 35%
  • Rear Windows: 35%
  • Windshield: must allow 70% of light
  • Reflectivity: no metallic/mirrored
  • Side mirror restrictions: no restriction
  • Color restrictions: no restriction
  • Medical exemptions: no medical exemptions

Idaho

  • Front Side Windows: 35%
  • Back Side Windows: 20%
  • Rear Windows: 35%
  • Windshield: Tinting of the AS-1 line allowed
  • Reflectivity: no more than 35% reflective
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrored required
  • Color restrictions: no restrictions
  • Medical exemptions: allowed

Illinois

  • Front Side Windows: 35%
  • Back Side Windows: 35%
  • Rear Windows: 35%
  • Windshield: 6 inches
  • Reflectivity: not allowed.
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors required
  • Color restrictions: no restrictions
  • Medical exemptions: not specified

Indiana

  • Front Side Windows: 30%
  • Back Side Windows: 30%
  • Rear Windows: 30%
  • Windshield: Above AS-1 line
  • Reflectivity: no more than 25% reflective
  • Side mirror restrictions: not specified
  • Color restrictions: not specified
  • Medical exemptions: not specified

Iowa

  • Front Side Windows: 70%
  • Back Side Windows: Any
  • Rear Windows: Any
  • Windshield: Above AS-1 line
  • Reflectivity: no excessive reflections allowed
  • Side mirror restrictions: no restriction
  • Color restrictions: no restriction
  • Medical exemptions: not allowed since 2012

Kansas

  • Front Side Windows: 35%
  • Back Side Windows: 35%
  • Rear Windows: 35%
  • Windshield: Above AS-1 line
  • Reflectivity: no metallic or mirrored tinting
  • Side mirror restrictions: double mirrors required
  • Color restrictions: amber, red, and yellow not allowed
  • Medical exemptions: Kansas laws do not allow medical exceptions.

Kentucky

  • Front Side Windows: 35%
  • Back Side Windows: 18%
  • Rear Windows: 18%
  • Windshield: Above AS-1 line
  • Reflectivity: below 25% 
  • Side mirror restrictions: no restriction
  • Color restrictions: no restriction
  • Medical exemptions: not specified

Louisiana

  • Front Side Windows: 40%
  • Back Side Windows: 25% 
  • Rear Windows: 12%
  • Windshield: Above AS-1 line
  • Reflectivity: below 20% 
  • Side mirror restrictions: no restriction
  • Color restrictions: red and amber not permitted
  • Medical exemptions: does not allow medical exemptions

Maine

  • Front Side Windows: 35%
  • Back Side Windows: Any
  • Rear Windows: Any
  • Windshield: 4 inches
  • Reflectivity: non-reflective
  • Side mirror restrictions:  double side mirrors needed
  • Color restrictions: No specific colors are prohibited.
  • Medical exemptions: granted by the Chief of the State Police.

Maryland

  • Front Side Windows: 35%
  • Back Side Windows: 35%
  • Rear Windows: 35%
  • Windshield: 5 inches
  • Reflectivity: not specified
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed
  • Color restrictions: red, yellow, and amber not allowed
  • Medical exemptions: not allowed

Massachusetts

  • Front Side Windows: 35%
  • Back Side Windows: 35%
  • Rear Windows: 35%
  • Windshield: 6 inches
  • Reflectivity: below 35% 
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors are required
  • Color restrictions: No colors are prohibited
  • Medical exemptions: medical exemptions can be granted

Michigan

  • Front Side Windows: any (only 4 inches from the top of the window)   
  • Back Side Windows: any
  • Rear Windows: any
  • Windshield: 5 inches
  • Reflectivity: below 35% 
  • Side mirror restrictions: not specified
  • Color restrictions: all tints are allowed
  • Medical exemptions: Medical exemptions can be granted.

Minnesota

  • Front Side Windows: 50%
  • Back Side Windows: 50%
  • Rear Windows: 50%
  • Windshield: none allowed
  • Reflectivity: below 20%
  • Side mirror restrictions: not specified
  • Color restrictions: No colors are restricted
  • Medical exemptions: It allows medical exemptions for special tint.

Mississippi

  • Front Side Windows: 28%
  • Back Side Windows: 28%
  • Rear Windows: 28%
  • Windshield: AS-1 and above (manufacturer’s line) 
  • Reflectivity: no more than 20% reflective
  • Side mirror restrictions: not specified
  • Color restrictions: No colors are restricted
  • Medical exemptions: not specified

Missouri

  • Front Side Windows: 35%
  • Back Side Windows: Any
  • Rear Windows: Any
  • Windshield: AS-1 and above (manufacturer’s line) 
  • Reflectivity: No more than 35% allowed
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors required if the backside glass is tinted
  • Color restrictions: No colors are prohibited 
  • Medical exemptions: The State allows for a 3% variation of the VLT limits

Montana

  • Front Side Windows: 24%
  • Back Side Windows: 14%
  • Rear Windows: 14%
  • Windshield:  AS-1 and above (manufacturer’s line) 
  • Reflectivity: No more than 35% allowed
  • Side mirror restrictions: no restrictions
  • Color restrictions: amber, red and yellow tints are not permitted in the state
  • Medical exemptions: The state allows for medical exemptions, but fines for not complying with the law can be as high as $500

Nebraska

  • Front Side Windows: 35%
  • Back Side Windows: 20%
  • Rear Windows: 20%
  • Windshield: 5 inches/ AS-1 line 
  • Reflectivity: only below 35%
  • Side mirror restrictions: no restrictions specified
  • Color restrictions: red, amber, and yellow tinting colors are not permitted in this state.
  • Medical exemptions: Nebraska does not allow any medical exemptions.

Nevada

  • Front Side Windows: 35%
  • Back Side Windows: Any 
  • Rear Windows: Any
  • Windshield: AS-1 and above (manufacturer’s line) 
  • Reflectivity: no specifications
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed
  • Color restrictions: red and amber colors not permitted
  • Medical exemptions: the state allows for medical exemptions.

New Hampshire

  • Front Side Windows: no tinting allowed
  • Back Side Windows: 35%
  • Rear Windows: 35%
  • Windshield: 6 inches
  • Reflectivity: metallic / mirror tints prohibited
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed if the backside windows are tinted
  • Color restrictions: No colors are prohibited in New Hampshire
  • Medical exemptions: The state allows for medical exemptions for the windshield tinting.

New Jersey

  • Front Side Windows: no tinting allowed
  • Back Side Windows: any
  • Rear Windows: any
  • Windshield: no tinting allowed
  • Reflectivity: metallic / mirror tints prohibited
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed if the backside windows are tinted
  • Color restrictions: No colors are banned,
  • Medical exemptions: special tints can be requested due to proven specific medical conditions. Fines can be as high as $5000 for repeated offenses.

New Mexico

  • Front Side Windows: 20%
  • Back Side Windows: 20%
  • Rear Windows: 20%
  • Windshield: 5 inches / AS-1 line (manufacturer’s line) 
  • Reflectivity: no law
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed if the backside windows are tinted
  • Color restrictions: amber, red and yellow colors are not permitted in the state
  • Medical exemptions: Medical exemptions are allowed for special tints.

New York

  • Front Side Windows: 70%
  • Back Side Windows: 70%
  • Rear Windows: any
  • Windshield: 6 inches
  • Reflectivity: metallic / mirror tints prohibited
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed if the backside windows are tinted
  • Color restrictions: No colors are prohibited
  • Medical exemptions: medical exemptions are allowed for special tints

North Carolina

  • Front Side Windows: 35%
  • Back Side Windows: 35%
  • Rear Windows: 35%
  • Windshield: allowed up until the manufacturer’s line
  • Reflectivity: below 20% 
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed if the backside windows are tinted
  • Color restrictions: red, amber and yellow are not permitted
  • Medical exemptions: not specified, but a 3% variance on the VLT limit is allowed in this state.

North Dakota

  • Front Side Windows: 50%
  • Back Side Windows: any
  • Rear Windows: any
  • Windshield: below 70% VLT
  • Reflectivity: metallic / mirror tints prohibited
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed if the backside windows are tinted
  • Color restrictions: There are no color restrictions 
  • Medical exemptions: North Dakota no longer accepts medical exemptions.

Ohio

  • Front Side Windows: 50%
  • Back Side Windows: any
  • Rear Windows: any
  • Windshield: below 70% VLT allowed
  • Reflectivity: no more reflective than a standard window.
  • Side mirror restrictions:  not specified
  • Color restrictions: Local laws don’t mention any prohibited colors
  • Medical exemptions: no mention of allowances for medical exemptions. Fines can be up to $120.

Oklahoma

  • Front Side Windows: 25%
  • Back Side Windows: 25%
  • Rear Windows: 25%
  • Windshield: 5 inches on manufacturer’s line
  • Reflectivity: below 20% allowed
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed if the backside windows are tinted
  • Color restrictions: No prohibitions on the colors mentioned.
  • Medical exemptions: Oklahoma allows for medical exemptions.

Oregon

  • Front Side Windows: 35%
  • Back Side Windows: 35%
  • Rear Windows: 35%
  • Windshield: 6 inches
  • Reflectivity: below 13% VLT allowed
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed if the backside windows are tinted
  • Color restrictions: Red, green, yellow, black and amber tints are not allowed.
  • Medical exemptions: Oregon allows darker tints for medical exemptions. Fines can be as high as $360.

Pennsylvania

  • Front Side Windows: 70%
  • Back Side Windows: 70%
  • Rear Windows: 70%
  • Windshield: not allowed
  • Reflectivity: metallic and mirrored tints are prohibited
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed if the backside windows are tinted
  • Color restrictions: not specified
  • Medical exemptions: not specified

Rhode Island

  • Front Side Windows: 70%
  • Back Side Windows: 70%
  • Rear Windows: 70%
  • Windshield: manufacturer’s line and above tinting allowed
  • Reflectivity: no law
  • Side mirror restrictions: No other restrictions
  • Color restrictions: all colors allowed 
  • Medical exemptions: not specified. Fines can be as high as $250 per offense.

South Carolina

  • Front Side Windows: 27%
  • Back Side Windows: 27%
  • Rear Windows: 27%
  • Windshield: manufacturer’s line and above tinting allowed
  • Reflectivity: not allowed
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed if the backside windows are tinted
  • Color restrictions: Tinting in amber, yellow, and red colors are not allowed. 
  • Medical exemptions: South Carolina allows medical exemptions for special tint. Fines can be as high as 200 and include 30 days in prison.

South Dakota

  • Front Side Windows: 35%
  • Back Side Windows: 20%
  • Rear Windows: 20%
  • Windshield: allowed above the manufacturer’s line
  • Reflectivity: metallic and mirrored tints are prohibited
  • Side mirror restrictions: There are no restrictions on mirrors
  • Color restrictions: There are no restrictions on colors
  • Medical exemptions: South Dakota does not allow for any medical exemptions, but the State allows for a variance of 6% on the VLT limit. 

Tennessee

  • Front Side Windows: 35%
  • Back Side Windows: 35%
  • Rear Windows: 35%
  • Windshield:  allowed above the manufacturer’s line
  • Reflectivity: metallic and mirrored tints are prohibited
  • Side mirror restrictions: There are no restrictions on mirrors
  • Color restrictions: There are no restrictions on colors
  • Medical exemptions: The state allows medical exemptions for special tint.

Texas

  • Front Side Windows: 25%
  • Back Side Windows: 25%
  • Rear Windows: any
  • Windshield: 5 inches or manufacturer’s line
  • Reflectivity: below 25% VLT reflectivity
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed if the backside windows are tinted
  • Color restrictions: amber, blue, and red colors are not allowed.
  • Medical exemptions: not specified

Utah

  • Front Side Windows: 43%
  • Back Side Windows: any
  • Rear Windows: any
  • Windshield: tinting allowed above the manufacturer’s line
  • Reflectivity: metallic and mirrored tints are prohibited
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed if the backside windows are tinted
  • Color restrictions: There are no restrictions on colors
  • Medical exemptions: medical exceptions can be granted.

Vermont

  • Front Side Windows: no tinting is allowed in Vermont
  • Back Side Windows: any
  • Rear Windows: any
  • Windshield: tinting allowed above the manufacturer’s line
  • Reflectivity: metallic and mirrored tinting is prohibited
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed if the backside windows are tinted
  • Color restrictions: there are no restrictions on colors 
  • Medical exemptions: medical exceptions can be granted to darker the tint.

Virginia

  • Front Side Windows: 50%
  • Back Side Windows: 35%
  • Rear Windows: 35%
  • Windshield: tinting allowed above the manufacturer’s line
  • Reflectivity: below 20% VLT allowed
  • Side mirror restrictions: not specified
  • Color restrictions: red, amber, and yellow colored tints are prohibited
  • Medical exemptions: special tints permits can be obtained with medical exemptions.

Washington

  • Front Side Windows: 24%
  • Back Side Windows: 24%
  • Rear Windows: 24%
  • Windshield: 6 inches
  • Reflectivity: below 35% VLT allowed
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed if the backside windows are tinted
  • Color restrictions: red, green, yellow, black and amber tints are not allowed.
  • Medical exemptions: not specified

Washington D.C.

  • Front Side Windows: 70%
  • Back Side Windows: 50% (cars), 35% (MPV)
  • Rear Windows: 50% (cars), 35% (MPV)
  • Windshield: 5 inches or manufacturer’s line
  • Reflectivity: not specified
  • Side mirror restrictions: not specified
  • Color restrictions: no restriction specified
  • Medical exemptions: medical waivers are permitted. Fines can be as high as $1000

West Virginia

  • Front Side Windows: 35%
  • Back Side Windows: 35%
  • Rear Windows: 35%
  • Windshield: 5 inches
  • Reflectivity: up to 35% reflective allowed
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed if the backside windows are tinted
  • Color restrictions: Colored tints in amber, red, and yellow are not allowed.
  • Medical exemptions:  It allows medical waivers for special tints. Fines can be as high as $200

Wisconsin

  • Front Side Windows: 50%
  • Back Side Windows: 35%
  • Rear Windows: 35%
  • Windshield: tinting allowed above the manufacturer’s line
  • Reflectivity: not specified
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed if the backside windows are tinted
  • Color restrictions: there are no restrictions on colors 
  • Medical exemptions: Medical waivers can be required for a darker tint. The State allows for a 3% variance on the VLT limit. 

Wyoming

  • Front Side Windows: 28%
  • Back Side Windows: 28%
  • Rear Windows: 28%
  • Windshield: 5 inches or manufacturer’s line
  • Reflectivity: up to 25% reflectivity allowed
  • Side mirror restrictions: double side mirrors needed if the backside windows are tinted
  • Color restrictions: no red, yellow, and amber tints can be used on the windshield. Any color can be used in the other windows. 
  • Medical exemptions: darker tints can be obtained with medical exemption documentation.

Conclusion

Tinting your car’s windows can have incredible benefits for your health and your driving experience. It can also improve the look of any car! However, it is important to understand local laws to avoid incurring various issues. Have you tinted your car’s windows recently? Did you find it easy or have you face some difficulties? Let us know by leaving a comment below!

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